Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History

Location

315 East Warren Avenue
Detroit
,
MI
48202
,
US

Website

Description

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is located in the Cultural Center of the U.S. city of Detroit, Michigan. Founded in 1965, it holds the world's largest permanent exhibit on African American culture. Welcome to the world's largest institution dedicated to the African American experience! The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History provides learning opportunities, exhibitions, programs and events based on collections and research that explore the diverse history and culture of African Americans and their African origins. Founded in 1965 by Detroit obstetrician Dr. Charles Wright, this 125,000 square foot museum is located in the heart of Midtown Detroit's Cultural Center. Key to the experience is And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture, the Museum's 22,000 square foot, interactive core exhibit, which attracts and enthralls thousands of visitors per year. Thousands more enjoy a wide array of spectacular events including concerts, film screenings, lectures, performances, community health & fitness classes, and so much more!

Future Events

- No events -

Past Events

Saturday
Apr
29
2017
Saturday, April 29, 2017 from noon-4pm
noon-4pm
The new administration has attacked the hard-won protections of our climate, health, and communities, and the rights of people of color, workers, indigenous people, immigrants, women, LGBTQIA, young people, and more. We've fought back with a wave of protests larger than at almost any other point in history — let's make sure that we mark the 100th day of his presidency with another mass action that stands up for our communities. With everything at stake, everyone has a role to play, whether you’ve been marching for decades or you’re coming out for the first time. Join us on April 29th at 12pm ET at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History 315 E. Warren Ave, Detroit, MI 48201. Sign-up to let us know you're planning to be there. Let's march together!
Sunday
Apr
9
2017
Sunday, April 9, 2017 from 3-5pm
3-5pm
General Baker Institute presents its first event! We welcome everyone and please share! Panel discussion followed by Q&A
Monday
Jan
16
2017
Friday
Aug
19
2016
Friday, August 19, 2016 at 11am through Sunday, August 21, 2016 at 11pm
11am through Sunday, August 21 at 11pm
The 34th annual African World Festival is FREE. For more information, call: 313-494-5824 or email: awf@thewright.org
Tuesday
Jul
28
2015
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 from 5:30-7pm
5:30-7pm
Are you frustrated with our public transit? Share your ideas for improving transit. Learn about DDOT & the new regional transit authority. A light meal will be provided.
Monday
Jan
19
2015
Monday, January 19, 2015 from 1-4pm
1-4pm
What would Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. have to say about the recent racial strife in Ferguson, Missouri and New York City? How would his beliefs apply in the longstanding conflict between Palestine and Israel? In remembrance of the life and legacy of Dr. King, the Arab American National Museum and the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History are jointly presenting a free afternoon of film and discussion about King’s messages and strategies as they relate to both the African American and Arab American communities in the 21st century. The event, 1-4 p.m. Monday, Jan. 19, 2015, at The Wright Museum, 315 E. Warren Ave. in Detroit, includes screenings of The Wright Museum’s biographical film A King Among Us and the 2014 documentary Al Helm (The Dream): Martin Luther King in Palestine, directed by Connie Field and making its southeast Michigan premiere with this presentation. In Al Helm (The Dream): Martin Luther King in Palestine, an African American gospel choir is the Greek chorus for a Palestinian play on Martin Luther King which tours the West Bank preaching nonviolence in early 2011. The choir is apprehensive about working with Palestinians whose American media image is that of angry, violent terrorists. For the Palestinian actors, Americans are unconditional supporters of their occupiers. It is a personal and cultural exchange that, over the course of the journey, radically transforms their ideas about each other. Happy to finally visit the Holy Land, the choir witnesses life in the occupied Palestinian territories, performs in a unique theater inside a refugee camp run by Juliano Mer-Khamis (at right) using art as an alternative to violence, and meets Fadi Quran, a young leader of a nonviolent movement for justice. At the end of their tour, reality will astonishingly mirror the play on MLK, a man who died for his beliefs. On the very day of the anniversary of MLK’s murder, Juliano Mer-Khamis is assassinated, sending shock waves throughout the country and the world. The next day at the final night of the play, the actors perform in the aftermath of his death, articulating their lines with a new and heartrending immediacy. As the choir leaves, King’s legacy lives on, as Fadi Quran and other young Palestinians board ‘settler only’ buses in an act of civil disobedience. A panel discussion follows the film screenings, focusing on issues of community building, community service, and ways to diffuse racial and ethnic tensions. Panelists include Will See, youth coordinator at East Michigan Environmental Action Council; Amanda Ghannam of Kairos USA's board of directors and former Students for Justice in Palestine organizer; Dr. Jeffery D. Robinson, principal at Paul Robeson/Malcolm X Academy and pastor at Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church, both in Detroit; and Zena Ozeir, community activist. THIS PROGRAM IS A JOINT PRESENTATION OF THE ARAB AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM AND THE CHARLES H. WRIGHT MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY.
Saturday
Sep
6
2014
Saturday, September 6, 2014 from 6:30-9:30pm
6:30-9:30pm
General Gordon Baker Jr. of Detroit is one of the most significant 20th century revolutionaries. On Sunday, May 18, 2014 he passed away. An intellectual of immense gravity, Gen Baker was loved and respected across the ideological spectrum. His life covered 60 years of activity, inspiring two generations of revolutionaries with his advocacy for social and political revolution. A second memorial tribute will be held to honor General on Saturday, September 6, 2014, at The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, 6:30 pm. This program will feature comments by four revolutionaries who worked with General in the movement struggles from the 60's till the present. All are welcome! http://www.facebook.com/events/1490763477828544/
Saturday
Jun
7
2014
Saturday, June 7, 2014 from 12:30-3pm
12:30-3pm
Film series and discussion in collaboration with The Charles H. Wright Museum and the "Changing America" exhibit on the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 to the March on Washington in 1963. Created Equal Film Showing The Freedom Riders Free entrance to the "Changing America" exhibit included in event-free and open to the public RSVP- 313-870-1500 or sstevens@miroundtable.org
Friday
Jun
6
2014
Friday, June 6, 2014 from 5:30-8pm
5:30-8pm
In partnership with the Detroit Loving Day Group the June First Friday Forum will be a film and discussion on the Loving Story. http://lovingfilm.com/ Film series and discussion in collaboration with The Charles H. Wright Museum and the "Changing America" exhibit on the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 to the March on Washington in 1963. Created Equal Film Showing The Loving Story Free entrance to the "Changing America" exhibit included in event-free and open to the public RSVP- 313-870-1500 or sstevens@miroundtable.org
Thursday
Jun
5
2014
Thursday, June 5, 2014 from 5:30-8pm
5:30-8pm
Film series and discussion in collaboration with The Charles H. Wright Museum and the "Changing America" exhibit on the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 to the March on Washington in 1963. Created Equal Film Showing Slavery by Another Name Free entrance to the "Changing America" exhibit included in event-free and open to the public RSVP- 313-870-1500 or sstevens@miroundtable.org