Future Events

- No events -

Past Events

Thursday
May
21
2015
Thursday, May 21, 2015 from 5-8pm
5-8pm
Venue:
@
Novi High School
For just three hours May 21, visitors to the Novi High School auditorium lobby will see what has been happening for years: housing discrimination in metro Detroit. A special exhibit, We Don't Want Them Here, tells the compelling story of metro Detroit's housing history through a racial lens. Via historic documents, photographs and personal narratives, the exhibit will open the viewer up to personal accounts of the formation, challenges and eventual destruction of communities that once stood within the local area. It's one of the subjects taught at Novi High in Seth Furlow's class, Social Justice Dialogues. "We discuss mostly the notion of oppression and privilege, at first through a racial lens, but also cover topics such as poverty, gender, LGBT issues and religion," Furlow said. The class took about three years to develop and implement. With help from partners at the University of Michigan School of Social Work and Farmington Schools (which developed the original curriculum), it started this school year in Novi. About 50 students enrolled in two semesters and as many have signed up for the 2015-16 school year. "Our Novi students really were the ones who became aware of this need and really pushed us to keep working on getting the class started," Furlow said. The immediate impact it's having on students is evident right now, but it's the long-term implications that, hopefully, will create the biggest change. "It's important that we don't repeat the bad parts of history," student Chloe Allen said. "The more we understand these issues, the more likely it is that we can prevent them from happening again." In addition to the recent sub-prime mortgage crisis, students are currently learning about red-lining and other practices preventing African Americans from buying suburban houses. "This historical perspective will really connect the idea that some of these awful practices of the past are still happening, but just in different ways, today," student Isabela Coenca said. Eye-opener Once they began studying the topic, Furlow said students were surprised. They didn't realize it was not legally possible for African Americans to obtain the same kind of mortgages as whites and they were unaware of the outward protests that occurred as a result of some neighborhoods becoming even slightly integrated. "I think the level of institutional racism was shocking to them," Furlow said. "Many have seen, heard of or experienced individual racism before, but it was quite eye-opening for them to see this on a level being pushed by local, state and federal governments." Now the Novi community can get educated too through the We Don't Want Them Here exhibit, created by a group within the Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion and part of the Race2Equity Community Engagement Campaign. According to that group's website (http://www.race2equity.org/exhibit.html), the exhibit has toured throughout metro Detroit since 2010 and has been viewed by hundreds of thousands of people. The exhibit has been at libraries, schools, colleges, places of worship and business organizations. The exhibit will be on display 5-8 p.m. Thursday, May 21, at Novi High School. "Most people don't know that Detroit is the most segregated metropolitan community in the United States, so learning about how this came to be will help people become more culturally conscious as we work towards a more equitable society," student Meaghan Wheat said. As classmate Cordon Willis pointed out, regardless of our interests, opportunities to learn from actual stories of historical discrimination are not often available. "We need to look at our history if we want to create a better future," Willis said. How the exhibit came about "The We Dont Want Them Traveling Exhibit came about after the constitutional ban of Affirmative Action passed in Michigan in 2006," said Dez Squire, MSW, JD, who is the exhibit coordinator of Race2Equity Project, Michigan Roundtable for Diversity & Inclusion. "An interfaith group, convened by the Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion in 2007, began researching as to why legislation like affirmative action was necessary in today's society." Squire added that during this period, interfaith members saw a PBS series called Race: the Power of an Illusion, and were surprised by the impact a person's zip code had on an individual's future opportunities because of the United States' history of institutional racism throughout major policies like the Federal Housing Administration and historical moments like the 1967 Uprising. While designing and working on the exhibit, Rozenia Johnson, the exhibit's curator, stated that "it was important to tell not just the history of race and housing, but to highlight unknown heroes and put faces to different historical events." "Ms. Johnson recalled having brainstorming sessions with other Race2Equity organizers as 'there were specific people Race2Equity wanted highlighted given their historic significance but that may not have necessarily been known. It was important to highlight the pioneers or individuals who made a significance contribution.' In addition to the brainstorming sessions, many of these pioneers were identified through newspapers or literature written during time," said Squire. cstone@hometownlife.com | Twitter: @TheNoviNews
Saturday
May
9
2015
Saturday, May 9, 2015 from 9am-2pm
9am-2pm
Farwell Community Garden is a garden that is over approximately 200X75 that grows vegetables and fruits for the community.
Saturday
Mar
28
2015
Saturday, March 28, 2015 from noon-3pm
noon-3pm
Venue:
@
Chene Park
50 years later, same issues, same fight. March from Chene Park to Belle Isle to promote jobs, justice and peace for all! call: 313-541-3846.
Wednesday
Mar
25
2015
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
What would you sacrifice for the cause of freedom? Lioa Liuzzo was a white Detroit mother of five, a Wayne State University student and a member of the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Detroit. She joined the campaign for voting rights in Selma, Alabama. She was murdered by Klansmen on March 25, 1965.
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 from 6-7:30pm
6-7:30pm
Issues: Michigan is 29th in personal tax equality; Michigan ranks 48th in percent of local and state taxes contributed by businesses; and Michigan's median income has fallen from 16th to 35th since 1999.
Tuesday
Mar
24
2015
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 at 7pm through Thursday, March 26, 2015 at 9pm
7pm through Thursday, March 26 at 9pm
Teach-In for Peace: 50th Anniversary of the First Anti-War Teach-In _______________________________ This event builds on the 50th Anniversary of the original 1965 Teach-In against the War in Viet Nam. Join academics and activists from the first teach-in and today as we assess lessons of the past and engage the war situations of today. This is an open, free, public event. As part of "Teach-in Week", please continue participation in the University of Michigan’s Teach-In +50: End the War Against the Planet, Friday and Saturday, March 27th and 28th. The wars on the earth and the wars against the earth are related. http://sites.lsa.umich.edu/teach-in-50/ _____________________________ Tuesday March 24: 7-10pm, Opening Session: Auditorium B Angell Hall Remembering the Vietnam War and the Culture and Politics of that Time and what's changed. Featuring 1965 Teach-In organizers, Prof. Frithjof Bergmann, Tom Mayer, Jack Rothman, Julian Gendell and Alan Haber, with commentators and questioners Opening questions then and still: Do we deal with conflict by diplomacy or by war? How do we speak of the unspeakable? Where are the women? (of the 41 names on the first teach-in flyer, only one woman) Wednesday, March 25th Session 1: 3:00-5:30 PM, School of Social Work Commons. Lessons and Organizing Featuring John Marciano/Jack Rothman (Vietnam: Commemoration or Crime?); Bert Garskof (googling Vietnam); Bernardine Dohrn and Bill Ayers (resistance, then and now); Ken Wachsberger (the Underground press and digital future,) Mike Whitty, and others Session 2: 7:00-9:00 PM, International Institute Meeting Room What’s Happening in the World Today? Empire, Trade Deals, nuclear weapons, Ukraine, plus... Featuring Tom Mayer, Ian Robinson, Bob King, Odile Hugonot Haber, Eugene Bondarenko, plus... Thursday, March 26th Session 3: 3:00-5:30 PM, Room B780 Schoolof Social Work lower level Hot topics: Israel/Palestine and wars in the Middle East, Featuring Yusif Barakat and Alan Haber and a panel in formation Session 4: 7:00-9:00 PM, International Institute Meeting Room Winning The Peace: What have we learned? Featuring Michael Heaney, Karen Jacob, Zelda and Bill Gamson, and others. Student Social Work Allies for Immigrant Rights / University of Michiagan School of Social Work Megiddo Peace Project megiddo@umich.edu http://www.facebook.com/events/446097078888814/
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 from 12:15-1:15pm
12:15-1:15pm
Hear Professor Jon Weinberg discuss President Obama's initiative to give administrative immigration relief to about 4 million people. Hear updates on attempts to block this action through the courts.
Monday
Mar
23
2015
Monday, March 23, 2015 from 12:15-1:30pm
12:15-1:30pm
Hear Professor Ismo Polonen from the University of Finland.
Friday
Mar
20
2015
Friday, March 20, 2015 from 11am-1pm
11am-1pm
March 20 11 a.m. & NOON. MEXICO BORDER: A HUMANITARIAN CRISIS. For more info check out link above about the Immigrant Worker Project
Thursday
Mar
19
2015
Thursday, March 19, 2015 from 7-8:30pm
7-8:30pm
Venue:
@
Cinema Detroit
This film resurrects the buried history of the outrageous, often brilliant women who founded the modern women's movement from 1966 to 1971.